Saturday, August 29, 2015

Sandra Cisneros Will Deliver This Year's Paumanok Lecture!

UPDATED 29 AUGUST 2015

The acclaimed author Sandra Cisneros will be delivering the annual Paumanok Lecture on Tuesday, October 6, 2015, at 6:30 PM, in the Kumble Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Please consider bringing your classes or offering extra credit for students who attend. Perhaps you could assign some of Cisneros’ writings in your course.

Also, Professor Louis Parascandola (English) will be teaching a one-credit course tied to Cisneros and the Paumanok.

Cisneros will be reading from and discussing her forthcoming memoir, A House of My Own.  Professor Jessica Hagedorn (English / Creative Writing MFA Program) will conduct a brief on-stage interview, and Cisneros will take questions from the audience.


Professors: the reading is free and open to the is free and open to the public, but the Kumble Theater is asking for attendees to RSVP so they can know how many people to expect and save seats for LIU students. If you plan to bring your classes to the event (and we hope you do!), RSVP with a head countYou can do this the first week of class.

More details are forthcoming...

SANDRA CISNEROS is the author of the highly acclaimed novel The House on Mango Street, and the story collection, Woman Hollering Creek. In addition to other novels and short stories, she has published collections of poetry, essays, and, most recently, a memoir, A House of My Own.  She is the recipient of numerous awards, including National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the Lannan Literary Award, the American Book Award, the Thomas Wolfe Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Her work has been translated into more than 20 languages. Cisneros is the founder of the Alfredo Cisneros Del Moral and Macondo Foundations, which serve creative writers.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Downtown Brooklyn #24

The "cover" of Issue #24:
"La Disparition #2" by Lewis Warsh.
For 24 years, Downtown Brooklyn: A Journal of Writing has been the literary magazine of the English Department. We are happy to announce the online publication of our 24th annual issue. We are sad to report, however, that this will be the last issue for the foreseeable future. Please read Wayne Berninger's "From the Editor" note at our main page.


Click here to download Issue #24.




New Book of Poems by Tejan Green & Jeremy Beauregard

Jeremy Beauregard and Tejan Green, both graduates of the English Department's Creative Writing MFA program have published a collection of poetry entitled We Were Us.

The book is "an examination of what is—and what was—through a reflexive lens focused on future, and past, relationships. All roses have died, and, ultimately, the love here is inaccessible. We Were Us is just as unapologetic as it is empathetic."

The book is available in print and Kindle online and is also available directly from the authors

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Downtown Brooklyn: A Journal of Writing

the cover of Issue #24, "La Disparition #2" by Lewis Warsh

Download Issue #24.













Download Issue #23.






FROM THE EDITOR

It is with no small amount of sadness that I announce that Issue #24 will very likely be the final issue of Downtown Brooklyn. When I took over as Editor in 1998-99 (issue #8), our annual print run was 2000 copies. Since then, a series of budget cuts at LIU has forced us to reduce our print run, first to 1000 copies in 2009, then to 500 copies in 2013, and then to zero copies in 2014, when we produced our first online-only issue. While I am grateful that we have been able to produce issue #24—another online-only issue—I regret to say that as of this writing, a way forward for the magazine is unclear. Until such time as our funding can be restored, I have no choice but to say that the magazine will be on indefinite hiatus.

I am happy to report that Downtown Brooklyn has received many compliments over the years, but such praise is not mine alone. It also belongs to a host of other people without whose enthusiasm and dedication the magazine could not have survived as long as it has, and I want to take this opportunity to thank them for helping to make the magazine such a wonderful publication and one that has reflected so very well on the English Department and on LIU Brooklyn. With regard to those instances in which the magazine has fallen short of expectations and for all errors that have made their way into print (or pixilation), I take full responsibility.

The list of people I have to thank is very long (see the index in Issue #24). Please forgive me for not thanking everyone by name here.

I must begin with Barbara Henning and Rudy Baron, with whom I founded Downtown Brooklyn in 1992. Thank you for creating and entrusting us with the magazine. I hope you’re proud of what we’ve been able to achieve.

To the 81 people who have served (in some cases for many years) as editors, associate editors, assistant editors, copy editors, members of the editorial committee, and/or as my editorial advisors—some of you without ever publishing your own work in our pages—thank you for the generous donation of your time and for your hard work and expert advice.

Eleven of the abovementioned 81 were graduate assistants assigned to work with me at various times between 1998 and 2009, and they deserve special acknowledgement. Thank you for working so hard and for generally making my job easier. I am not so vain as to assume that you learned much from me, but I hope that look back with fondness on our work together.

Finally, to the 463 poets and prose writers, and to the 47 visual artists (illustrators, sculptors, painters, comics artists, and photographers) whose contributions have so enlivened our pages, thank you for trusting us with your work. You are the magazine’s heart, and I sincerely thank you from the bottom of mine.        

                                                -- Wayne Berninger




ABOUT THE MAGAZINE

Downtown Brooklyn is the literary magazine of the English Department at LIU Brooklyn. The magazine showcases a wide variety of work (in traditional forms as well as more experimental styles) by undergrads; grad students; alumni; current and former faculty; and administrative, clerical and other staff from across the Campus—not only from English. One issue has appeared every year since 1992.

The university environment exposes us to a variety of personalities and ideas, but on a commuter campus, it's easy to feel alienated from each other and from the overall campus culture. It's difficult to take advantage of what your campus has to offer if you always have to rush straight to the subway after class. It's hard enough just to get to class on time, let alone find out that the person next to you in the elevator is a great writer. But who knows? The person sitting behind you in class might be your future favorite novelist or the next [insert name of favorite poet]. If you aren't tuned in to what other people are doing on campus, you're really missing out.

Downtown Brooklyn: A Journal of Writing (ISSN 1536-8475) was founded in 1992 to showcase poetry and literary prose by writers at LIU Brooklyn. We feature a wide variety of work in traditional forms as well as more experimental styles. We have published the work of undergraduates and graduate students; full-time and adjunct faculty members; and administrative, clerical and other staff from across the Campus. Our aesthetic is eclectic. Our mission is to promote not any particular style but all the different kinds of writing being created on campus.

Issues #1-22 are available in the periodicals collection of Salena Library at LIU Brooklyn. A set of these issues is also available in the Little Magazine Collection at the University of Wisconsin (Madison).

Monday, August 24, 2015

Charles Matz: New Book, Columbus, the Moor

In his new "Atlantic World epic" from House of Nehisi Publishers, Professor Charles Matz (English) "opens the music of Earth's breast, from Arawakan illusions to cynical jests of a Eurocentric logic of burden." (Jay Haviser) and mercilessly sets us up for the day of "encounter" when Christopher Columbus and "a termite crew" arrive in what would come to be called the New World.

From the publisher's website: 
"The literary works of Charles Matz are extremely complex...What distinguishes his work is his plunging into the bottomless pit of lasting orality, the long and varied history of poetry-song-ritual."
– Andrea Zanzotto, Italy

Click the book cover above to order.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Undergraduate Courses -- Fall 2015

Don't be late! Register now for Fall 2015!

There are no advanced English courses being offered in Summer 2015.

These course descriptions are provided by the professors teaching the courses.

For more information, write to them directly. Get English Department faculty contact info here.

ENG 126 News Writing (Course ID# 4894)
Professor Jennifer Rauch (Journalism Department)
Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:30-2:55

This course will satisfy a Writing & Rhetoric elective requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy the Writing & Rhetoric requirement in either the Literature concentration or the Creative Writing concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. Please note that this course is cross-listed with JOU 119. Students who wish this course to count toward the English major (or minor) should be sure to register for ENG 126 — not JOU 119. Contact the Journalism Department for information about the content of this course.

ENG 128 Early British Literatures (Course ID# 5060): Monsters, Shape-shifters, and Outsiders in Early British Literatures
Professor Sealy Gilles
Mondays & Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 PM

This course is required in the Literature concentration.  It can satisfy a Literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor.

Welcome to the strange and wonderful world of pre-modern England! In 1000 C.E. England was Europe’s far west frontier, an unsettled island of competing fiefdoms and migratory peoples. By 1600 London was the western world’s largest city and Queen Elizabeth I ruled over a colonial power soon to become the British Empire. The early literature of this island nation reflects the multiple identities of the English people, but it is also troubled by an often violent history and by the specter of strange beings, both benign and monstrous. This semester our cast of aliens stars Grendel, the swamp dwelling humanoid, a werewolf, and a giant Green Knight. Outsiders in human form include Chaucer’s gender-bending Pardoner and Shakespeare’s Moor. As we explore the alien in works ranging from Beowulf to Shakespeare’s Othello, you will be asked to write frequently, participate actively, and read closely.  You may expect that I will respect your ideas and respond quickly and fairly to your work.

ENG 158 Early Literatures of the U.S. (Course ID# 4099)
Professor Leah Dilworth
Mondays 6-8:30 PM

This course is required in the Literature concentration.  It can satisfy a Literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor.

In this course, we will explore American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War through the theme of freedom and oppression. Freedom from oppression has been at the heart of American cultural and political identity since at least the 17th Century, even though the colonial and early national economies relied, to varying degrees, on slave labor. This contradiction fueled the Protestant literature of the New England colonies, Revolutionary political discourse, the movement for women’s rights, and the movement to abolish slavery. We will explore how American writers and artists negotiated these contradictions as they formed new, distinctive American voices. Readings will include works by William Bradford, Mary Rowlandson, Handsome Lake, Thomas Jefferson, Phillis Wheatley, Samson Occom, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Rebecca Harding Davis, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

ENG 164 Explorations in Creative Writing (Course ID# 4945)
Professor Lewis Warsh
Wednesdays 6-8:30 PM

This course is required in the Creative Writing concentration.  It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy the Creative Writing requirement in either the Literature concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. Any student may take this course a second time for credit.

The goal of the workshop is to expand our ideas of “what is a poem” and “what is a work of fiction.” Are poetry and fiction exclusive or related genres? Weekly assignments will question preconceived notions of form, content and gender, with emphasis on the best ways of transcribing thought processes and experiences into writing. We will also attempt to engage the present moment--the issues of our time, if any, that influence our writing. Is it possible to write in a vacuum while ignoring the rest of the world? What is the writer's responsibility? Can writing change the world? We will read as models the work of William Carlos Williams, Amiri Baraka, Frank O'Hara, Andre Breton, Lydia Davis, Gertrude Stein, Ted Berrigan, Elizabeth Bishop, John Ashbery, Wang Ping, Roberto Bolaño and Ernest Hemingway, among many others. Much of the workshop time will be spent reading and discussing each other's writing.

ENG 165 Poetry Workshop (Course ID# 4136): Spirit & Dream Autobiographies In Poetry (Who Were You Then, Who Are You Now?)
Professor John High
Tuesdays & Thursdays 3-4:15 PM

This course will satisfy a Creative Writing elective requirement in the Creative Writing concentration.  It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy the Creative Writing requirement in either the Literature concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. English majors concentrating in Creative Writing may take this course a second time for credit.

In this course we will begin to sculpt our poetic writings into the language of spirit and dream autobiographies. Humanity's attempt to understand itself throughout the ages has often resulted in a fringe of writing engaged in a poetry of quest, prophecy, vision, verbal experimentation, and meditative stories that express the changes of self in the world. In your own writing quest, your discoveries may tread between the realms of journey, dream, fictional autobiography, haiku, and traditional verse, while leading you to a deeper sense of awareness and awe of the secret depths of human character and verbal expression. Poetic autobiographies may include stories and poetic prose; indeed, language itself can only help guide and gauge a spiritual journey, but through language we discover and present the shifting and mysterious points of our identities and the worlds around us.

In this workshop we will have a chance to glimpse one another's strengths and weaknesses in writing and to offer suggestions as to how to improve and build on our true intentions in the work. We will touch upon the themes of parallel worlds and quantum leaps of imagination: who were you then, and who are you now? The readings will also include the study of Wabi Sabi (the beauty of imperfection). We will set out to understand the "strivings" of each piece of writing in order to determine the ways in which it can be structured and developed into a whole and, afterwards, offer constructive criticism and helpful suggestions to the author. There will be class discussions on what we mean when we talk about the autobiography as a gathering ground for material evolving out of the imagination's eye and the worlds it inhabits in dream as well as reality; concurrently, there will be readings and class discussions on the nature of memory, improvisation, and persona. We will scrutinize the craft of the pieces and explore how we might more effectively implement, extend, and develop the techniques and forms of these poems in our own evolving work. The goal of the course includes completion of a chapbook of writing and culminates in a group reading and party at semester’s end.

We’ll be reading Gary Zukov’s The Dancing Wu Li Masters, Andrew Juniper’s Wabi Sabi—The Japanese Art of Impermanence, and Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s The Little Prince, and a collection of writings ranging from Emily Dickinson to bell hooks.

ENG 169 Non-Western or Post-Colonial Literature (Course ID# 6060): The Black Atlantic
Professor Jonathan Haynes
Mondays & Wednesdays 3-4:15 PM

This course is required in the Literature concentration.  It can satisfy a Literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor.

The African diaspora was not a simple matter of Africans being transported to the New World as slaves.  “The Black Atlantic” names the dense networks built up over the centuries as Black people crisscrossed the ocean in all directions, maintaining connections between Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and the Americas. This matrix gave birth to rich transnational cultures and to various conceptions of pan-Africanism.  We will consider the facts of the matter, the histories of slavery, black sailors, cosmopolitan intellectuals, and labor migrants.  We will follow African deities and symbols—Mami Wata, Elegba, the Sankofa bird—to the New World.  Film, the visual arts, and music will come into the story, but we will be principally concerned with how this inspiring if often painful history has been represented and interpreted by writers from Olaudah Equiano to Chimamanda Adichie.

ENG 170 Literary Periods & Movements (Course ID# 6059): Harlem Renaissance
Professor Carol Allen
Thursdays 6-8:30 PM

This course will satisfy the Literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. Any student may take ENG 140, 150, 170 or 180 a second time for credit.

This course will feature the major and minor voices of the Harlem Renaissance. We will study the philosophies of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B DuBois, Alain Locke, Langston Hughes, Marcus Garvey and Zora Neale Hurston and read works by them along with texts (novels, stories, poems, plays and hybrid works) from Countee Cullen, Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Georgia Douglass Johnson, Marita Bonner, Nella Larsen, James Weldon Johnson, Wallace Thurman, and others. Attention will also be given to art and music from the period. Skills to be strengthened include: close reading, writing with revision, research, analysis, and using texts to spark your own creative output. Assignments will include a informal writing, in-class writing, leading class discussion, and a research paper or creative response with research and metatext.

ENG 171 Introduction to Classical Rhetoric (Course ID# 5513)
Professor John Killoran
Tuesdays 6-8:30 PM

This course will satisfy a Writing & Rhetoric elective requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy the Writing & Rhetoric requirement in either the Literature concentration or the Creative Writing concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. Note: This course is designed not only for English majors and minors but also for students from disciplines such as Education, Business, Political Science, Journalism, and Media Arts who seek to develop their skills as critical readers, persuasive writers, and engaged citizens.

Students have been studying classical rhetoric for more than 2400 years, starting with the ancient Greeks, so why study it in 2015? Classical rhetoric offers us guidelines for how to be persuasive. In ancient times, rhetoric played a key role in the birth of our traditions of democratic politics and law. In modern times, classical rhetoric has been revived to guide us in analyzing the persuasive messages around us and to make our own writing more persuasive.

In this course, students will learn concepts from classical rhetoric and apply them to analyze contemporary writing, speaking, and multimedia communication in . . .
  • politics and law;
  • advertising, marketing, and public relations;
  • traditional media and new digital media;
  • our personal lives and communities. 
By the end of the course, students will better recognize how language persuades us of what we believe and whom we believe. Students will also have developed their sensitivity to the power in others’ use of language and will become more empowered in their own use of language.

ENG 174 Teaching Writing (Course ID# 6061)
Professor Donald McCrary
Tuesdays & Thursdays 4:30-5:45 PM

This course will satisfy a Writing & Rhetoric elective requirement in the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. It can satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. It can satisfy the Writing & Rhetoric requirement in either the Literature concentration or the Creative Writing concentration. It can also be applied toward the English minor. English majors concentrating in Writing & Rhetoric may take this course a second time for credit.

The course will examine theories and practices of the teaching of writing for both college and high school instructors. The course will explore theoretical and pedagogical issues of writing instruction such as invention, process, curriculum design, literacy, conferencing, and development. Theories and practices regarding the integration of reading and writing in the writing classroom will be a significant focus. The course will discuss important contemporary issues such as ELL learners, multi-modal instruction and texts, the Common Core, and the academic essay. In the course, students will read and discuss the works of prominent composition and reading theorists such as Louise Rosenblatt, David Bartholomae, Lisa Delpit, and Cynthia L. Selfe.



FOR ENGLISH MAJORS (AND MINORS)
IN THE HONORS PROGRAM—

The following Honors electives (taught by members of the English Department faculty) may be applied to the English minor or major. Any of the following will satisfy the Literature requirement in either the Creative Writing concentration or the Writing & Rhetoric concentration. Any of the following can  also satisfy a general English elective requirement in the Literature concentration. Any of the following could also be applied toward the English minor. Please discuss your situation with Wayne Berninger in the English Department before you register.

HHE 116 Advanced Elective Seminar (Class ID# 6082)
Professor Louis Parascandola Mondays 6-8:30 PM

HHE 117 Advanced Elective Seminar (Class ID# 6083)
Professor Srividhya Swaminathan Wednesdays 3-5:30 PM

HHE 118 Advanced Elective Seminar (Class ID# 6084)
Professor John High Thursdays 6-8:30

HHE 119 Advanced Elective Seminar (Class ID# 6085), Professor Andrea Libin Wednesdays 6-8:30 PM



Voices of the Rainbow: Celebrating the Oral Tradition (English Department Reading Series)

Since 1993, the English Department at LIU Brooklyn has hosted this series of poetry and fiction readings.

Readings are free and open to the public.

Several programs have been presented in collaboration with the School of Education’s Department of Teaching and Learning, the Gender Studies Program, and/or the English Club.

Watch The Longest Island for information about the next event. You will also find Voices of the Rainbow events listed in the calendar on our LibraryThing venue page.


LIST OF PAST READINGS


2015


March 26, 2015: Lara Vapnyar & Tayari Jones

February 9, 2015: Gary Shteyngart (Paumanok Lecture)

February 9, 2015: Rowan Ricardo Phillips & Idrissa Simmonds



2014


October 27, 2014
Alison Donnell
October 9, 2014
Sandra Maria Esteves & Cynthia Hogue
October 8, 2014
Gaiutra Bahadur & Tiphanie Yanique
September 5, 2014
Robert Antoni
April 9, 2014 
Marilyn Boutwell & Liz Dalton 
April 1, 2014
Ayana Mathis
March 5, 2014
Evie Shockley & Cheryl Boyce Taylor
February 26, 2014
Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts
February 25, 2014
Edwidge Danticat (Paumanock Lecture)


2013

November 18, 2013
Suzanne Corso
November 13, 2013
Naomi Replansky & Edward Field
November 7, 2013
Roger Bonair-Agard & Jesus Papoleto Melendez
October 7, 2013
Catherine Chung & Yvonne Cassidy
April 17, 2013
Les Murray
April 16, 2013
Andriana Alefhi
April 2, 2013
Wendy Lee & Joseph Lennon
March 27, 2013
Danielle Mebert & Felice Belle
February 6, 2013
Edwin Torres & Jason Schneiderman


2012

November 14, 2012
Martha Witt & Glenville Lovell
October 9, 2012
Elizabeth Nunez & Kamala Nair
October 3, 2012
Paolo Javier & Irina Reyn
March 29, 2012
A’Lelia Bundles
March 28, 2012
Patricia Smith & David Mills
February 27, 2012
Jayne Cortez & Bernice McFadden
February 23, 2012
Alison Bechdel (Paumanok Lecture)
February 16, 2012
Terrance Hayes


2011

November 14, 2011
Tina Chang
October 13, 2011
Heidi Durrow & Dahlma Llanos Figueroa
October 5, 2011
Paola Corso & Sandra Maria Esteves
September 27, 2011
Eduardo Chirinos
April 29, 2011
Harryette Mullen
April 13, 2011
Patricia Spears Jones & Alicia Berbenick
April 4, 2011
Gary Shteyngart & Sonya Chung
March 28, 2011
Sapphire
March 3, 2011
Valzhyna Mort


2010

Nov. 1, 2010
Afaa Weaver & Merrill Feitell
Oct. 28, 2010
Kevin Young & John Morillo
Oct. 6, 2010
Michael Thomas & Anton Nimblett
Apr. 19, 2010
Susan Choi & Patrick Rosal
Apr. 14, 2010
William Burgos & Tejan Green
Mar. 2, 2010
Colum McCann
Feb.22, 2010
Merle Collins & Sandra Maria Esteves
Feb. 11, 2010
Michael Thomas


2009

Nov. 10, 2009
Roger Sedarat & Tiphanie Yanique
Oct. 26, 2009
Kevin Baker
Oct. 7, 2009
Thomas Sayers Ellis & Jacqueline Bishop
Apr. 15, 2009
Charulata Dyal (MFA student), Michael Hassan (English Department adjunct professor) & Uche Nduka (MFA student)
Apr. 7, 2009
Ellen Litman & Nathalie Handal
Apr. 2, 2009
Colum McCann (CANCELLED)
Mar.11, 2009
Suheir Hammad & Joyce Zonana
Feb. 23, 2009
Kwame Dawes & Willie Perdomo


2008

Dec. 10, 2008
Charles Dickens' Holiday Story The Chimes, performed by David Houston
Nov. 6, 2008
Kelly Zen-Yie Tsai
Oct. 8, 2008
Gary Shteyngart & Marie-Elena John
Oct. 2, 2008
Walter Mosley (Paumanok Lecture)
Apr. 9, 2008
Pamela Sneed, Lara Stapleton & Margot Marie Nasti
Apr. 1, 2008
Ishle Yi Park
Mar. 24, 2008
Major Jackson & Kwame Dawes
Mar. 4, 2008
Gregory Pardlo & Jennifer Knox
Feb. 20, 2008
Sandra Maria Estevez & Cheryl Boyce Taylor
Feb. 4, 2008
Elizabeth Nunez


2007

Nov. 13, 2007
Monique Truong & Heidi W. Durrow
Nov. 6, 2007
Taha Muhammad Ali
Oct. 17, 2007
Jayne Cortez & Annecy Baez
Oct. 1, 2007
Edgardo Vega Yunqué & Janice Erlbaum
Apr. 17, 2007
John High, Cecelia Muhlstein & Jeremy Beauregard
Apr. 12, 2007
Paul Muldoon
Apr. 2, 2007
Nahid Rachlin, Kym Ragusa & Patrick Rosal
Feb. 12, 2007
David Mills
Feb. 5, 2007
Toure


2006

Nov. 16, 2006
Susan Choi
Oct. 30, 2006
Sapphire
Oct. 25, 2006
Gary Shteyngart & Nathalie Handal
Oct. 17, 2006
Linton Kwesi Johnson
Oct. 4, 2006
Marita Golden
Jun. 15, 2006
Patricia Smith, Cheryl Boyce Taylor & Tish Benson
May 25, 2006
Sapphire
Apr. 12, 2006
Joseph Bruchac
Apr. 6, 2006
Giannina Braschi
Apr. 5, 2006
Barbara Henning, Anele Rubin & Ashley Carter-Sinclair
Mar. 2, 2006
Ha Jin
Feb. 13, 2006
Meena Alexander & Patrick Rosal


2005

Nov. 17, 2005
Lara Vapnyar and Mia Yun
Nov. 9, 2005
Nathalie Handal, Luis Francia, and Sholeh Wolpe
Oct. 11, 2005
Sandra Maria Estevez
Oct. 10, 2005
Piri Thomas
Oct. 4, 2005
Bernice McFadden
Apr. 13, 2005
Angie Cruz & Sandra Maria Estevez
Apr. 6, 2005
Danny Hoey, Sarah Kolbasowski & Sherry Mason
Mar. 30, 2005
Caryl Phillips
Feb. 17, 2005
Ishle Yi Park
Feb. 9, 2005
Randall Kenan


2004

 

Nov. 10, 2004
Daniela Gioseffi & Paola Corso
Oct. 19, 2004
Tracy K. Smith & Tina Chang
Oct. 13, 2004
Dorothy Allison
Oct. 4, 2004
Tish Benson & Bonair Agard
Apr. 13, 2004
Jay Wright
Mar. 29, 2004
Jayne Cortez & Zohra Saed
Feb. 25, 2004
Touré
Feb. 12, 2004
Danzy Senna


2003

 

Nov. 12, 2003
E. Ethelbert Miller
Oct. 21, 2003
Open Mike & Tracie Morris
Oct. 15, 2003
Marjorie Agosin
Oct. 2, 2003
Louis Reyes Rivera & Kenji Jasper
Apr. 16, 2003
Merle Collins
Apr. 1, 2003
Christina Chin & Nahid Rachlin
Mar. 3, 2003
Meera Nair & Kenji Jasper
Feb. 25, 2003
Willie Perdomo
Feb. 10, 2003
Edwidge Danticat

 

2002

 

Nov. 6, 2002
Alexander Chee
Oct. 28, 2002 
Cornelius Eady
Oct. 10, 2002 
Judith Ortiz Cofer
Oct. 2, 2002 
Carmen Boullosa & Mia Yun
Oct. 1, 2002 
Cheryl Boyce Taylor
Apr. 17, 2002 
Wayne Berninger, Andrea Libin & Mei-Luen Liu
Apr. 8, 2002 
Jeffrey Renard Allen & Kelvin Christopher James
Mar. 28, 2002 
Suheir Hammad & D. H. Melhem
Mar. 7, 2002 
Angie Cruz & Nellie Rosario
Feb. 25, 2002 
Cheryl Boyce Taylor
Feb. 13, 2002 
Piri Thomas

 

2001

 

Nov. 19, 2001
Carolyn Ferrell & Thomas Glave
Nov. 13, 2001
Wanda Phipps
Nov. 5, 2001
Ernesto Quinonez and Abraham Rodriguez
Oct. 18, 2001
Ken Corsbie
Oct. 11, 2001
Chang-rae Lee
Apr. 18, 2001
John High, Lisa Jarnot, Earl Clark & Phaedra Moore
Apr. 9, 2001
Nuruddin Farah
Apr. 4, 2001
Elizabeth Nunez
Mar. 1, 2001
Patricia Chao & Wanda Phipps
Feb. 22, 2001
Wesley Brown


2000

 

Nov. 14, 2000
Willie Perdomo
Nov. 13, 2000
Colin Channer and Staceyann Chin
Nov. 1, 2000 
Ernesto Mestre
Oct. 10, 2000
Ernesto Quinonez
Oct. 3, 2000
Victor LaValle & Cheryl Boyce Taylor
Apr. 12, 2000
Jessica Hagedorn & Wang Ping
Apr. 5, 2000
Jacqueline Woodson
Mar. 6, 2000
Loida Maritza Perez & Willie Perdomo
Feb. 29, 2000
Evangeline Blanco
Feb. 24, 2000
Junot Diaz & Colin Channer
Feb. 10, 2000
Maryse Conde

 

1999

 

Nov. 15, 1999
Kimiko Hahn & Ameena Meer
Nov. 1, 1999
Manchild in the Promised Land
Oct. 14, 1999
Omar Tyree
Apr. 6, 1999
Glenville Lovell
Apr. 5, 1999
Women of the Calabash
Mar. 8, 1999
Fae Myenne Ng
Feb. 23, 1999
Amiri Baraka
Feb. 10, 1999
Christina Garcia


1998

 

Nov. 10, 1998 
Jayne Cortez & Andrea Louie
Oct. 29, 1998 
Martin Espada
Oct. 5, 1998 
Ntozake Shange, Edwidge Danticat, Sapphire & Abena Busia
Apr. 16, 1998 
Jessica Care Moore
Apr. 7, 1998 
Cenen & Jack Agueros
Mar. 19, 1998 
Lloyd Brown
Mar. 9, 1998 
Ishmael Reed
Feb. 4, 1998 
Raouf Mama


1997

 

Nov. 18, 1997 
Kwadwo Kamau & Junot Diaz
Oct. 20, 1997 
James McBride
Sep. 25, 1997 
Paule Marshall
Apr. 23, 1997 
Miguel Algarin
Apr. 14, 1997 
Cheryl Clarke
Apr. 8, 1997 
Patricia Smith
Mar. 5, 1997 
Fay Chiang & Julio Marzan
Feb. 3, 1997 
Gloria Naylor


1996

 

Dec. 5, 1996 
Cenen & Glenville Lovell
Nov. 6, 1996 
Rosa Guy
Oct. 9, 1996 
Yevgeny Yevtushenko
Apr. 22, 1996 
David Lamb & Edwidge Danticat
Mar. 12, 1996 
Kimiko Hahn
Feb. 7, 1996 
Gwendolyn Brooks


1995

 

Dec. 6, 1995 
Claude Brown
Nov. 9, 1995 
Malika Lee Whitney
Oct. 11, 1995 
Nicholasa Mohr
Apr. 27, 1995 
Reg E. Gaines & Tracie Morris
Apr. 3, 1995 
Jon Yasin & Friends
Mar. 6, 1995 
Yelena Khanga
Feb. 15, 1995 
Ntozake Shange

 

1994

 

Dec. 9, 1994 
Jayne Cortez & Sapphire
Nov. 10, 1994 
Edwidge Danticat & Sandra Maria Esteves
Oct. 11, 1994 
Paul Keens-Douglas
Apr. 18, 1994 
Grace Nichols
Mar. 21, 1994 
Yelena Khanga
Feb. 23, 1994 
The Jones Twins


1993

 

Dec. 10, 1993 
Sapphire & Reg E. Gaines
Dec. 1, 1993 
Amiri Baraka
Oct. 28, 1993 
Abena Busia